More stories about Department

  • Back in the Game

    Late-night television is inundated with products designed to bring buff abdominals to the flabby masses.

  • Crypto Proof?

    Cryptosporidium, or crypto as it is often called, has become the leading cause of recreational water illnesses in the United States, according to surveillance reports published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

  • Required Reading

    Thousands of dollars are spent annually on the writing and updating of employee manuals, handbooks, brochures and guides.

  • New Material

    One of the fastest-growing trends in indoor pool ventilation is fabric air dispersion, or ductwork, as an alternative to conventional metal.

  • Fun Factor

    Imagine a day when your aquatics staff is not only enthusiastically attending in-service trainings, but also contributing ideas about content and structure.

  • A Healthy Relationship

    As a health inspector, I come at the issue of pool operations from a different perspective than many other aquatics professionals. Some operators may view me as the “bad cop,” someone who makes doing their jobs that much harder.

  • Pattern Treatments

    In the early 1950s, physicians and therapists were scrambling to find treatments that might work for a new crop of polio patients.

  • Watered Down: TWO

    Many aquatics professionals are hearing reports about swim meets where athletes have to queue up in the hallway because the natatorium air is too polluted to breathe.

  • Resistance Is Not Futile

    The pool is a perfect place to perform progressive resistance exercise (PRE) or strength training during early rehab.

  • Safety Check

    With everything from hazardous chemicals to heavy equipment, aquatics facilities are a potential land mine for risk managers.